Recent Articles

Celebrating Torah in a World that’s Gone Bonkers

This article was originaly published in Uncategorized.

As the 5775 Jewish High Holiday season winds downs, as those of us with delayed work projects gear up to catch up, this period feels like it is sputtering to a close rather than building to a spiritual climax. It often seems that both Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah should be entered in the Silly Holiday Derby. The pointlessness of Shmini Atzeret, an eighth day tagged onto Sukkot, after the lulav-crashing intensity of Hoshanna Rabba, has launched a thousand sermons, and, it seems, a thousand different rationales.  I remain unconvinced. Do we really need another day off with more burdensome prayers, heavy meals and leaden sermons? And, after the kind of year we had, who is really having a Simchat Torah, any kind of rejoicing with the Torah?

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Jewish studies scholars shouldn’t whitewash campus Israel-bashing

This article was originaly published in The Jerusalem Post.

wish Studies professors recently signed a petition “deplor[ing]” a threat to “the kind of spirited academic exchange that is the lifeblood of the university.” What so infuriated these academics? It wasn’t Israel-apartheid weeks. It wasn’t epidemic classroom anti-Israel bias. It wasn’t the fears many Jewish students have of being bullied this fall for supporting Israel.

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Next Year, Let’s Pass the (Kosher) Marshmallow Test

This article was originaly published in The Jerusalem Post.

In his thoughtful new book, The Vanishing Neighbor, on America’s declining sense of community, Marc Dunkelman describes the “Marshmallow Test.” In Walter Mischel’s legendary psychological experiment, four-year-olds could eat one marshmallow immediately – or get a second by waiting until a researcher returned.  A decade later, follow-up research revealed that those who delayed gratification for the larger reward were more successful academically, personally, morally, and better community members. This notion of “character,” Dunkelman explains, facilitates community building because the forbearance sometimes required to avoid sniping or to continue investing in others parallels the same “grit” and self-control required to achieve and to build a happy, constructive functional life.

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Don’t just dismiss the protesting military intelligence reservists

This article was originaly published in The Jerusalem Post.

It is tempting to join the pile-on against the 43 military intelligence reservists who “refuse to take part in actions against Palestinians.” How naïve! We all wish the Palestinians’ war against us would end, eliminating any need for any “actions” in self-defense.  The 200 reservists who counterattacked were correct: “Refusal to serve on the basis of politics has no room in the IDF.”  Yet I cannot join this chorus of condemnation so quickly. These protestors are our kids, who served honorably in a hellish mess – leaving them conscience-stricken because they have consciences. Their confusion, their moral struggle, and their anguish merits respect, even if they overstepped.

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Open Letter to my teenager visiting Poland

This article was originaly published in The Jerusalem Post.

Dear Yoni,

You know I feel ambivalent about your trip to Poland with your class tomorrow.  It’s not about safety – Poland is friendly toward Israel.  Israeli gallows humor from this past war has someone asking a mother if her soldier son is ok.  Knowing he’s on the IDF’s Polish Journey she replies: “My son’s safe; he’s at Auschwitz.”

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We won’t give up on Nirim: A Bleeding Paradise

This article was originaly published in The Jerusalem Post.

On Tuesday morning, my cousin Adele Raemer who lives on Kibbutz Nirim along the Gaza Border, heard the all-too-familiar “Tzeva Adom,” red alert, with the usual explosions  following ten seconds later. This time, the booms were louder, more violent, as shrapnel from a Hamas mortar pelted her bedroom. The razor-sharp metal pieces, propelled rapidly, pockmarked her walls, generating clouds of dust.  Her water heater was hit – and the kibbutz’s electricity soon went out from other rockets in that barrage of seven or eight mortars.  Still reeling from weeks of warfare and the death days earlier of a four-year-old child from neighboring Nahal-Oz, she was understandably devastated. Unfortunately, her day got worse.

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Israel’s Patriotic Left Reflects Anti-Totalitarian Liberalism

This article was originaly published in Huffington Post.

Contrary to laments from the Far Left, Israel’s patriotic Left is behaving nobly and shrewdly, proving that liberal Zionism is alive and well. Hamas’s evil has united Israelis in their justified war of self-defense – even crime rates plummeted.  Israeli democrats, left to right, are teaching the world how to fight totalitarian Islamists.

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CNN feeds America’s mass Borderline Personality Disorder

This article was originaly published in Uncategorized.

Last week, while visiting friends who had CNN on in the background, I half-watched for about two hours. CNN’s reporting was obsessive, speculative, hysterical, sensational, and sadly lacking in context. The news show offered an endless loop, reporting the same story over and over again. We saw the same few images, the same phrases, the same news-crumbs recycled every few minutes again and again.  Viewers landed mid-story, at its most inflammatory juncture, without understanding the context. At one point, introducing a new image, the anchor admitted she had no idea what she was reporting, saying, “Whether or not that is Michael Brown we just don’t know.”

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